International Women’s Day may have come and gone…

… but that is no excuse for us to ignore women’s rights.

Women in the western world nowadays have grown up to enjoy legally protected freedoms, rights and duties that have (hopefully) been converging with those of men. This can be reflected in the growing public consent when it comes to “equality of sexes”.

However, things are not so great in the lesser-industrialised world.

I’ve just seen this video on how Afghanistan continues to be “the most dangerous place to be a women[sic]”.

According to Amnesty International (quoting the United Nations), over 87% of Afghani women have suffered domestic abuse, most of them repeatedly. Women have allegedly (and I use the term with no scepticism) been tortured at home by the male members of their own families.

In the video, we can read (hear, if you speak what I’m assuming to be Pashtu) a woman’s recollection of one episode (which I would rather not have to transcribe); this is followed by her ex-husband admitting to electrocuting her, along with their son. Alright…

  1. This, it seems to me, is said matter-of-factly. Not only matter-of-factly, it seems to be said with a grin. A G-R-I-N!
  2. Did I hear (read read) him mention his son? Not only are women tortured, by men they married nonetheless, but this abuse system is also being passed down form generation to generation? This kid was electrocuting his own mother!

Another worrying aspect is that growing public acceptance of female abuse (which is reaching levels close to those form Taliban times) is running parallel to the government’s lack of effort into women’s rights, as more conflicts step into the political forefront.

The video from Amnesty International can be found below.

Also, if you’re interested, I highly recommend watching Osama. It is a film by Afghan film director Siddiq Barmak which portrays life in Taliban-ruled Afghanistan from the perspective of a young girl caught between the proverbial rock and hard place.

Click here for more about Amnesty International.

Click here for more about Osama.

Click here for about Siddiq Barmak.

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